Posts Tagged ‘Adam Beilman’

King St. Q&A w/ Adam Beilman

Friday, January 6th, 2012

Adam Beilman is an AAE at SaatchiNY. For more info on his background and sports enthusiasm, be sure to follow him on Twitter @thebeils. He offers the most insightful commentary on The Buffalo Bills of anyone we know.

WHAT DO YOU DO AT SAATCHI & SAATCHI?
I’m an Assistant Account Executive on Head & Shoulders, but I suspect some people might think I’m still an intern …

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB?
I was a ride operator – specifically the Mind Eraser at Darien Lake Theme Park. Nobody ever died on my watch.

EDITORS NOTE: Here’s a picture of young Adam working said job -

WHAT LED YOU ON THE PATH YOU’RE ON TODAY?
I was a diehard basketball fan growing up, and would have asked mom to buy anything with Michael Jordan’s face on it. I recognized at a young age that advertising really worked when I felt the compulsive need to buy Gatorade. Shortly thereafter I realized advertising was also a real-life job you could have.

SECOND EDITORS NOTE: Here’s a picture of Adam standing in front of the famous Michael Jordan statue in Chicago -

WHAT ARE YOUR LOVEMARKS?
The Buffalo Bills, Guinness, Adidas, Ray-Ban, and yes, Gatorade

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE AD (ALL TIME OR CURRENTLY)?
There’s a common theme developing here:

IF YOU NEVER HAD TO WORK AGAIN, WHAT WOULD YOU WANT TO DO?
Start refining my (very unimpressive) golf game now to be ready for the PGA Senior Tour in 30 years.

FAVORITE PLACE YOU’VE BEEN TO?
I haven’t been that many cool places, and in fact have never lived anywhere outside of New York State. I’d like to visit every continent in my life. Except Antarctica. Screw penguins.

WHAT’S YOUR MOST PRIZED POSSESSION?
Does my Twitter account (@TheBeils) count as a possession? Because I don’t know how I could live without it.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE YOUTUBE VIDEO?
“I wanna kiss you.”

WHAT’S SOMETHING YOU MAKE REALLY WELL?
Breakfast. I’m a terrible cook for the other meals, but I own a griddle, waffle iron, several frying pans and two toasters for the most important meal of the day.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE WARM-WEATHER NYC ACTIVITY?
Running down the Hudson through Riverside Park. It’s my backyard.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE LUNCHTIME SPOT NEAR THE OFFICE?
Dos Toros – but I’m usually too lazy to walk there and end up at Chipotle.

WHAT’S YOUR GO TO KARAOKE SONG? (COME ON, WE KNOW YOU HAVE ONE).
I have a paralyzing fear of singing in public. That being said, if I had to do Karaoke, I’d go with an awkwardly self-censored version of some Biggie song, as I know all the words to several.

WHAT’S THE BEST MEAL YOU’VE EVER HAD?
Despite roots that are nowhere near Italian, my mom makes really great meatballs. My cousins started calling them “Auntie Balls,” and the name stuck.

IF YOU COULD BE THE WORLD RECORD HOLDER OF ANYTHING, WHAT WOULD IT BE?
I’d like to go around the world in 79 days. That would be a record, right?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE CREATIVE PURSUIT?
Naming fantasy and rec-league sports teams. Past entries include:

- We Fancy Huh?
- The Mexicutioners
- Jim Boeheimian Rhapsody
- Morning Norwood
- Ray Rice Guys Finish Last (an ESPN award winning name…not kidding)

WHAT BLOGS/MAGAZINES/BOOKS/PAPERS/WEBSITES CAN YOU NOT LIVE WITHOUT?
I’m a really big fan of Chuck Klosterman. “Eating the Dinosaur” is great, but so is everything he writes for my new favorite blog, Grantland.com.

WHAT’S THE LAST GREAT EVENT YOU WENT TO?
I saw “The Book of Mormon” a couple months ago. I’m not sure what a Tony is, but it should have won all of them.

WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED?
I was a shy kid, and my dad always reminded me that “the squeaky wheel gets the oil.” Now, I’m really good at complaining.

WHAT’S YOUR GREATEST NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE STORY?
I once won a spelling bee by correctly spelling sarsaparilla. It’s root beer-like drink commonly found in the Southwest and in Central America. It’s pronounced sas-pah-rill-a.

Category: King St. Q&A

SaatchiNY: MTP

Monday, November 28th, 2011

Mark Cochrane presents this year's winners w/ their $500 prize!

Each year, Saatchi & Saatchi offers Management Training Program “to entry-level employees in order to provide them with a solid understanding of the Saatchi & Saatchi way of doing business, develop the skills needed to ensure long-term professional success and build strong professional and personal relationships with others throughout the agency.” Yes, that definition is taken directly from the program kick-off slide. During the last week of the program, each of the five teams presents a pitch to the entire agency, with one team claiming bragging rights and a $500 cash prize.

Just before the Thanksgiving break we were ecstatic to announce Team 5 (Daniella Perez, Renee Siu, Jyah Hoy,  and Courtney Winegar) as the winners of this year’s  pitch, which was centered on Pampers. We’d like to thank and congratulate everyone who participated. Getting through the program is no easy feat, and we’re happy to have so many talented people working at SaatchiNY at the moment. Complete list of participants below.

Team 1

Woody Wright
Nicole Sander
Lauren Stillo
Laura Sammartino
Jacque Sloan

Team 2

Charlie Lodge
Kate Monahan
Alison Moser
Thea Hughes
Alice Ng

Team 3

Christine Raia
Courtney Griffin
Adam Beilman
Kelsey Montague
Steffan Bankier

Team 4

Molly Dwyer
Aisha Washington
Anitha Thenappan

Team 5

Daniella Perez
Renee Siu
Jyah Hoy
Courtney Winegar

Category: Awards, New York, Our People

Head & Shoulders “Mane Man”

Thursday, October 20th, 2011

A new football season brings a new round of advertising from Head & Shoulders “mane man,” Troy Polamalu. Men will go to any length to get legendary hair, from borrowing Troy’s shampoo to borrowing his hair altogether.

Troy’s third season as a spokesman for H&S also brought some hi-jinks. Madame Tussaud’s unveiled a wax figure of Troy at their museum in New York last week, but some visitors in LA were led to believe that the statue was completed this summer. The video’s had great success, picking up over a million hits already.

We’re All Apprentices

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Rishad Tobaccowala

Starting today, we’ve officially declared this week Events Week on Hudson/Houston. Be sure to check back every morning for a preview of our Advertising Week involvement and some great recaps of cool stuff happening this week. Kicking us off today is a guest post from Adam Beilman, who’s offering up the most useful bits from last Thursday’s DigiDay: Social conference.

The theme of Digiday: Social was “The Social Media Operating System” – how we can connect with consumers in an environment completely connected by social media. The conference featured a day full of discussions, panels and keynotes from industry pros. Through all the talks, a few overarching themes emerged:

WE’RE ALL APPRENTICES
Despite being invited to the conference to speak about their experience with social media, several were quick to point out that there really are no scholars. Social media is constantly evolving, and we’re all apprentices. The only way to master it is to use it yourself, and to use as many channels as possible. This is the only way understand both the tools and the people who use them.

LIKE VS LOVE
One of the biggest flaws in determining social media success is the number of “likes” a brand page has. All a “like” really is is an initiation for a brand to engage with you in some way – not a measure of your engagement. The most successful brands in social grow their following organically and are sought out because they are genuinely loved. There are many ways to earn or to buy “likes” – what matters is holding a fans interest and turning that like into love.

NO BUCKETS OR SILOS
Multiple speakers emphasized that traditional media silos have broken down. Social isn’t and shouldn’t be mutually exclusive of other channels – it is parts paid, earned and owned media. Use the space you own to tell stories, build communities, and drive brand advocacy among your fans.

Paid media on Facebook can allow you to reach the friends of your fans. Reggie Bradford of Vitrue explained that “Sponsored stories are the future of Facebook advertising.”

Once a foundation is built, surprising and delightful movements or social media stunts can create earned coverage and generate even more following.

CONTENT IS KING
As Rishad Tobaccowala of ViVaKi put it, “social media is not just a place to share…it is a place to discover.” People are looking for and are finding interesting content on social channels. You can never count on virality, but people will share things they find interesting and useful.

Walgreens proves this; their mobile app allows users to refill prescriptions by scanning the barcode. Why wouldn’t fans share an incredibly useful, free branded service? Expedia, another brand represented at the conference, held competitions with attainable prizes which made it too easy to invite friends and to come back every day.

PEOPLE ARE AT THE CORE
Don’t innovate for the sake of innovating. You need to understand your audience and create something that they actually want. It doesn’t make sense to use digital displays with QR codes if your target doesn’t use smartphones.

Begin by asking: “why did our fans like us in the first place?” These people are a powerful force. The companies that realize that they are marketing through them and not at them are the ones that will win.

Finally and most importantly, digital media doesn’t change the fact that consumers are analog – they make decisions with their hearts. Lovemarks will become more meaningful than ever.

The One Question Q&A – Part Two

Friday, August 5th, 2011

In lieu of our usual Friday King St. Q&A, we’re taking a different approach this week. You may or may not know that next Wednesday is the last one in the office for our Summer Interns. To mark the occasion, we present the second part of our One Question Q&A, wherein we asked all of the interns’ one question when they started . . . then the exact same question at the end of the summer. A few of these folks weren’t around for the first question, but we’ve included there answers too to see what they took away from the summer. Enjoy!

 The Question: “Why are you interested in Advertising?”

The Twist: They had to provide their answers in 140 characters or less.

CHRISTOPHER LILLY

Now: “I enjoy the speculative processes, exploring how the corporate world can use brand image to manage its relationship with the general public.”

Then: “For years, I’ve enjoyed analyzing brands and peoples’ conceptions of them. Consumer products were simply part of how I grew up.”

BERNADETTE STAINO

Now: “I learned how to work with other “leader” personalities cohesively. I gained confidence in myself and I now love advertising even more.”

Then: “I love the combination of people, culture and business that constantly evolves. This requires a youthful heart and passionate nature.”

CRISTINA PANSOLINI

Now: “The digital media aspect of advertising is growing rapidly, creating organic and viral marketing campaigns that surpass anything done before. We’re seeing more and more experts under the age of 30 who the CEOs and Presidents of the world rely on heavily. Saatchi has given me the drive to become one of those experts.”

Then: “Advertising interests me because of its creative and persuasive aspects, in addition to the fact that advertisers always have to be on the defensive.”

MARTA ALEMU

Now: “The exciting and fast paced world of advertising is one of the most creative industries there is. It gives brands personalities and brings them to life.”

Then: “Why are interested in advertising? I like the exciting, fast paced culture of advertising and the creativity involved.”

MEL FISH

Now: “Insights lead to big ideas and big ideas offer endless possibility. Advertising is the art of concentrating all of this and bringing it to life.”

Then: “Malcolm Gladwell got me interested in pop culture. There was no pop culture major available so I picked the next best thing. Advertising.”

CAROLYN MURDOCK

Now: “I like coming into work where everyone is trendier than me. It gives me something to strive for.”

Then: “I’m a big creative geek and a type-A control freak. Advertising seems like the best place for that seemingly paradoxical combination.”

CATHERINE BRYANT

Now: “I aspire to cut the busy work, the noise, and the crap that no one cares about out of people’s lives. Get to the point. What do people really care about?”

Then: “I’m an economist by training and am wildly curious about what incentivizes people. Advertising is the real life application of this, without having to do a boring PhD program.”

MEREDITH SAVATSKY

Now: “Free product samples. JK! It’s a fast pace, ever evolving industry. Also a humbling one- turns out I have room to develop my brain after all…”

Then: “It’s a field of work in which you get to use both the right and left side of your brain… and both sides of mine are just too developed to let go to waste.”

LILLIAN LIN

Now: “Advertising is interesting because it’s… like an ogre! It has layers! There’s the creative, the planning, and the account… with every layer you peel, you find something different and unique. But in the end they all come together to form something bigger and more meaningful.”

Then: “Advertising offers a unique combo of creative and analytical work. Everything is project-based so the work is always fresh. Plus, people are down-to-earth and no one wears suits!”

KELSEY GORDON

Now: “Interacting with people and delving deeper into the choices they make as consumers fascinates me. The potential that those insights provide for brands to change perceptions, and often cultural trends as a whole, is something that excites me to be a part of.”

Then: “I’ve always been a people person with a knack for persuasion and a passion for creativity. After my first ad class, I was hooked.”

EVE POLLET

Now: “It’s an industry based on the power of ideas and I love that. Every day I have spent at Saatchi I have been inspired by a person or an idea and that is exactly how I want my career to be.”

Then: “I have always been intrigued by new products, and the best way to introduce new products to the public is by advertising them. As a Sociology major I am also interested in the way the brand is communicated through advertising because it is a reflection of society and what people want.”

ANNA MIKA-ROUX

Now: “I was blessed to experience a Tribe session. I was amazed by the thinking process and break through ideas that came from putting twenty people, with VERY different personalities/work backgrounds, in a room for nine hours.”

Then: “Advertising presents an intellectual challenge to successfully position and promote a client’s product/service. I do not want to simply promote products; I want to help Saatchi & Saatchi spark emotional connections by turning their clients’ products/services into Lovemarks.”

ALYSSA POMPEO

Now: “I am interested in advertising because it’s exciting, creative, and it connects with people everywhere”

Then: “I am interested in advertising because it is a perfect outlet for me to express my interests in business and creativity. More importantly, with innovative forms of technology and media, advertising is reaching more people  all over the world. It is it an economical, creative, and socio-cultural industry that now is truly global and it is this global aspect that has truly peaked my interest in this field.”

KELISHA MENON


Now: “I love pushing myself out of my comfort zone to understand people with different beliefs. I love discovering why people love what they love.”

Then: “I love getting out of my comfort zone to understand people with different backgrounds, and seeing how brands provide meaning, not just function”

ANGELINA ANTONIO

Now: “Creative thinkers & doers catalyze change on so many levels & scales. I want to be one of those people. Being here solidified that.”

Then: “It allows me to reinvent myself, everyday. I see it like this: people are like ideas, new ones can change the world.”

THAO LE

Now: “Advertising is a dynamic industry that’s wrapped around inspirational ideas. No matter where I turn at Saatchi, innovation is everywhere.”

Then: “I started UT Austin as advertising major. After taking a few introductory courses in media planning, I fell in love with advertising.”

ADAM BEILMAN

Now: “Since I was a kid, I’ve loved advertising and basketball. At Saatchi I’ve learned that, unlike basketball, I can play in the big leagues.”

Then: “I first heard the Gatorade Be Like Mike song at age 7. Wanted to work in advertising shortly thereafter, when it was still stuck in my head.”

THEA HUGES

Now: “Ideas that have personality, telling the World a story, break trough barriers and make people think. My time at Saatchi has been filled with great story telling by people who have indefinitely colored my view on life. Advertising goes far beyond the product. ”

Then: “Its about intertwining brands with events, music & art to create a unique movement–Fashion lines that brand and position themselves in unconventional mediums.”

THOMAS CORDELL

Now: “It is a place for the mind to grow. You are surrounded by people who challenge you to break out of your little shell and BE a part of the world around you.”

Then: “Creative people are the best kind, I say. I love communicating ideas, be it through print, video, or especially music, so advertising is a natural choice for me.”

TARA LYNCH

Now: “I want to go into advertising because:  The people are crazy–in a good way… so at least I know I belong. Oh and because you learn something new every day.”

Then: “I wanted to go into advertising because it influences people to NEED the things they never knew they wanted. So, I wanted to learn why and how.”

BRIGITTA PARK

Now: “I love that the Advertising industry constantly evolves because there’s always an opportunity to learn something new!”

Then: “Advertising holds the ability to influence people across the world and the power to sustain the health of our planet for future generations.”

TAYLOR LUCAS
Now: “I don’t get yelled at when I doodle on my notes.”

NICK MARCHESE
Now: “To quote my first boss, Jerry Della Femina: “Advertising is the most fun you can have with your clothes on.”

RYAN KINNER
Now: I’m interested because of the ever changing styles of advertising. You always need to be looking for the next best thing and ideas can come from anywhere. Sitting still in advertising is to let opportunity fly by you.

Category: King St. Q&A

The One Question Q&A: Intern Edition

Friday, June 17th, 2011

In lieu of our traditional Friday King St. Q&A, we’re taking a different approach this Friday. As you may have seen from our post yesterday (or just wandering the halls), we’ve got a whole slew of interns in the house at Saatchi NY. And since we don’t have enough time during the summer to give each and every one of them their own Q&A treatment, we tried to come up with a way to at least give them a bit of face time. Enter: the two part Q&A, wherein we ask all of the interns’ one question now . . . then pose the exact same question to them at the end of the summer. Ideally we’ll glean how much they’ve learned and grown from their experiences in real-life advertising.

The Question: “Why are you interested in Advertising?”

The Twist: They had to provide their answers in 140 characters or less.

Enjoy!

Thomas

Thomas Cordell: “Creative people are the best kind, I say. I love communicating ideas, be it through print, video, or especially music, so advertising is a natural choice for me.”

Bernadette

Bernadette Staino: I love the combination of people, culture and business that constantly evolves. This requires a youthful heart and passionate nature.”

Kelsey

Kelsey Gordon: “I’ve always been a people person with a knack for persuasion and a passion for creativity. After my first ad class, I was hooked.”

Mika

Anna Mika-Roux (goes by Mika): “Advertising presents an intellectual challenge to successfully position and promote a client’s product/service. I do not want to simply promote products; I want to help Saatchi & Saatchi spark emotional connections by turning their clients’ products/services into Lovemarks.”

Yang

Yang Yang (first name pronounced Young): “My work in strategic planning allows me to be consumer-facing and tell the truth about them so that advertisers can give back in the best way.”

Marta

Marta Alemu: “Why are interested in advertising? I like the exciting, fast paced culture of advertising and the creativity involved.”

Kelisha

Kelisha Menon: “I love getting out of my comfort zone to understand people with different backgrounds, and seeing how brands provide meaning, not just function”

Carolyn

Carolyn Murdock: “I’m a big creative geek and a type-A control freak. Advertising seems like the best place for that seemingly paradoxical combination.”

Christopher

Christopher Lilly: “For years, I’ve enjoyed analyzing brands and peoples’ conceptions of them. Consumer products were simply part of how I grew up.”

Cristina

Cristina Pansolini: “Advertising interests me because of its creative and persuasive aspects, in addition to the fact that advertisers always have to be on the defensive.”

Catherine

Catherine Wright: “I am interested in advertising because of its potential to positively impact a community.  Although it can be overwhelming, the changes you want to make in the world cannot be accomplished with out it.”

Brigitta

Brigitta Park: “Advertising holds the ability to influence people across the world and the power to sustain the health of our planet for future generations.”

Lillian

Lillian Lin: “Advertising offers a unique combo of creative and analytical work. Everything is project-based so the work is always fresh. Plus, people are down-to-earth and no one wears suits!”

Adam

Adam Beilman: “I first heard the Gatorade Be Like Mike song at age 7. Wanted to work in advertising shortly thereafter, when it was still stuck in my head.”

Mel

Mel Fish: “Malcolm Gladwell got me interested in pop culture. There was no pop culture major available so I picked the next best thing. Advertising.”

Catherine

Catherine Bryant: “I’m an economist by training and am wildly curious about what incentivizes people. Advertising is the real life application of this, without having to do a boring PhD program.”

Meredith

Meredith Savatsky: “It’s a field of work in which you get to use both the right and left side of your brain… and both sides of mine are just too developed to let go to waste.”

Thea

Thea Hughes: “Its about intertwining brands with events, music & art to create a unique movement–Fashion lines that brand and position themselves in unconventional mediums.”

Tara

Tara Lynch: “I wanted to go into advertising because it influences people to NEED the things they never knew they wanted. So, I wanted to learn why and how.”

Angela

Angela Antonio: “It allows me to reinvent myself, everyday. I see it like this: people are like ideas, new ones can change the world.”

Eric

Eric

Eric Morrison: “One of my academic interests, as of recently, has been the history of material culture and American consumerism (I’m a history major). Therefore, I thought advertising would be a natural route through which I could transition into the “real world.”

Andre

Andre Gooden: “I am interested in advertising because of the power it has to influence a nation.”

Thao

Thao Le: “I started UT Austin as advertising major. After taking a few introductory courses in media planning, I fell in love with advertising.”

Alyssa

Alyssa Pompeo: I am interested in advertising because it is a perfect outlet for me to express my interests in business and creativity. More importantly, with innovative forms of technology and media, advertising is reaching more people  all over the world. It is it an economical, creative, and socio-cultural industry that now is truly global and it is this global aspect that has truly peaked my interest in this field.

Eve

Eve Pollet: I have always been intrigued by new products, and the best way to introduce new products to the public is by advertising them. As a Sociology major I am also interested in the way the brand is communicated through advertising because it is a reflection of society and what people want.